Talya Baharal - Statement


Aesthetic interpretations of vulnerability and decay combined with the bare essence of form and texture are at the core of my sculpture and jewelry.  


The cross-pollination of sculpture and jewelry, the materials of one medium spilling over into the other, the form and texture created during one body of work are re-worked and reappear in the other.


In my sculpture, I approach and utilize steel and paper in non-traditional methods.  Ever searching for unusual techniques, I use paper pulp in intuitive, sculptural and non-precious ways.  The humble qualities of steel wire and its tendency to rust draws me to this “mighty” material.  I use the wire to “draw” with and outline both two and three-dimensional structures.


The steel wire acts as an armature and the paper pulp becomes skin and connective tissue that binds the two together.  The process of aging and the visual tension between the fragile skin and the corroded skeletal form it attempts to contain and protect, illustrates our ongoing struggle for survival.


“Urban Landscape” is a series of unique jewelry pieces inspired by the streets of Pittsburgh, PA. During a month long sculpture project in the mid of winter - the residue and decay of ice, salt and rust stains on city sidewalks and asphalt surfaces, created a visual and material vocabulary from which I borrowed inspirations of nature’s corrosive elements. First to be utilized in the execution of my sculpture,  and then, to be revisited in the jewelry pieces.


Constructed forms of highly textured and painterly surfaces balance on delicate wire neck-armatures to create wearable sculptures. Surface texture and heat-induced patina are the result of a dialogue amongst different materials; allowing reactions to occur between various metals and solders create the palette which is then constructed into the piece itself.


The creative process is not a clean one. Inspirations from one area trigger inspirations in another. The beauty of decay is a concept that stretches across my work. Symbiotic explorations in different materials and different scales, the results of which are expressed as elements of ruination and rebirth - realized either in jewelry form or sculpture.